Brookgreen Gardens to Shed Light on Gullah Geechee Culture During Black History Month

Press Release

Brookgreen Gardens, the site of four former rice plantations, will host educational programming and exhibitions during Black History Month that shed light on Gullah Geechee culture and history. A National Historic Landmark, Brookgreen Gardens conserves and teaches the history of the South Carolina Lowcountry.

“Brookgreen is a cultural center for our community,” Brookgreen Gardens’ President and CEO Page Kiniry said. “Black History Month is an important time for us to teach about the people who lived and worked on these lands before the Huntington’s founded what is now Brookgreen Gardens.”

Black History Month Events

Gullah Geechee Islands, The Land and Us - Daily

This exhibition features art by Bluffton artist, Amiri Farris. Farris is known for his dynamic, colorful and powerful artwork. Combining an alluring blend of vivid colors and layered textures, the art brings to mind images of Sea Island Gullah culture and provides insight into his contemporary view of that culture. This exhibition is on display daily between 12:00 – 4:30pm in the Wall Lowcountry Center.

Silent Cities Cemetery Tours – Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays

These tours are a rare opportunity to travel on back roads to explore cemeteries at Brookgreen and learn about the historical burial customs of European and African origin. Tickets are $15 in addition to garden admission for this two-hour excursion.

Reign of Rice Lecture Series, February 15

Historian, writer and author Steve Williams will discuss self-sufficiency in this talk, which is part of the Reign of Rice Lecture Series. Williams will discuss accomplishments made by descendants of enslaved members of Georgetown County’s rice heritage. The lecture will be held at 1:00pm in the Wall Lowcountry Center and is free with garden admission. However, seating must be reserved at 843-235-6049.

Talkin Bout a Good Time, Ring Shouts and Praise Houses, February 19 & 26

Ron Daise, Brookgreen’s vice president for creative education, will host an interactive lecture on the history and importance of two cultural touchstones of Lowcountry Gullah Geechee communities. Participants will engage in sing-alongs and respond to fill-in-the-blank options. They will also leave with an understanding of how the two cultural practices connect with other communities of the African diaspora.

For more information on Brookgreen’s programming, visit www.brookgreen.org.

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